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Spring 2018 QUEST COURSES

 

Quest I

Blue text -sections ends by 3pm

Black text – sections ends after 3pm

Red text – interim course (5/14/18- 6/1/18)

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Intercultural Knowledge

How do people understand and bridge cultural differences?

Art 102 – Drawing 1: Ethnic Studies (ES) (HU) (XC)

001L LAB – MoWe 4:10-6:10PM

Beginning studio course in drawing for Art Majors and Minors. Emphasis on developing basic skills, and creative expression through visual exploration and problem solving. Credit cannot be received for both Art 111 and Art 102. The course will focus on the intercultural knowledge and competence question and counts toward the Ethnic Studies Requirement. Special fees may apply.

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Sustainability

How do people understand and create a more sustainable world?

Philosophy 104 – Ethics (HU) (XC)

001C-LEC – MoWeFr 8:00-9:00AM

Analysis of the principal theories of ethics and their practical application to problems concerning the individual and society. Proposed methods of justifying moral principles will be examined. Ethics 105 is the Non-Western Culture version of Ethics 104. Students cannot receive credit for both Philosophy 104 and 105.

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Quest II

Please make sure to choose Quest II courses when enrolling in TitanWeb. Some of the Quest II courses have the same titles as Explore courses (Quest II will be noted in Topic)

Blue text – sections end by 3 pm

Black text – sections end after 3 pm

Red text – interim course (5/14/18- 6/1/18)

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Civic Learning and Communication

How do people understand and engage in community life?

Business 259 – Predictably Misbehaving Behavioral Economics and Society (XS)

001C-LEC – MoWe 1:50-3:20PM

This course explores the ways individuals systematically deviate from rational economic behavior and why it causes suboptimal outcomes in our communities. We will ask questions about how this irrational behavior shapes business, consumer behavior, government, philanthropy, the environment, and our personal lives. Our focus will be on studying various public policies while also considering the ethical implications of these policies.

English 210 – Classical and Medieval Literature (HU) (XC)

001C-LEC – MoWeFr 10:20-11:20AM

A study of the literature from antiquity to the Renaissance, which may include classical works of Greece, Rome, Britain, and continental Europe. Prerequisite: Any Writing-Based Inquiry Seminar (WBIS 188), or English 101, or English 110. Writing assignments will be required.

English 212 – British Literature II (HU) (XC)

001C-LEC – TuTh 11:30AM-1:00PM

A study of English literature from 1800 to present. Prerequisite: Any Writing-Based Inquiry Seminar (WBIS 188), or English 101, or English 110. Writing assignments will be required.

History 110 – Topics in the History of Modern Civilization (SS) (XS)

001C-LEC – MoWeFr  9:10-10:10AM

Selected topics in the History of Modern Civilizations.

History 110 – Topics in the History of Modern Civilization (SS) (XS)

002C-LEC – MoWeFr 10:20-11:20AM

Selected topics in the History of Modern Civilizations.

History 110 – Topics in the History of Modern Civilization (SS) (XS)

004C-LEC – MoWeFr 8:00-9:00AM

Selected topics in the History of Modern Civilizations: Alexander Hamilton’s World.

History 210 – Topics in the Modern History of the United States (SS) (XS)

301C-LEC  INTERIM – MTWTF 12:30-3:30PM

Selected topics in the Modern History of the United States: Ethics in Democracy.

Music 110 – Music, Ethics and Community (HU) (XC)

001C-LEC –  MoWeFr 3:00-4:00PM

This course explores the ethical issues related to listening, appreciating, sharing, practicing, teaching, and thinking about music. How music is connected to identity and community will be researched. In this course, music is the instrument that is used to evaluate ethical theories and core beliefs while addressing concerns as they relate to self, community, culture, equality, personal values, the public good, civic traditions, and personal expression.

Philosophy 104 – Ethics (HU) (XC)

003C-LEC –  MoWeFr 1:50-2:50PM

Analysis of the principal theories of ethics and their practical application to problems concerning the individual and society. Proposed methods of justifying moral principles will be examined. Ethics 105 is the Non-Western Culture version of Ethics 104. Students cannot receive credit for both Philosophy 104 and 105

Political Science 105 – American Government and Politics (SS) (XS)

001C-LEC –  TuTh 9:40-11:10AM

003C-LEC –  MoWeFr 11:30AM-12:30PM

Organization, principles and actual working of the American National Government in all its branches.

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Intercultural Knowledge

How do people understand and bridge cultural differences?

African American Studies 101 – Exploring African American Studies (ES) (HU) (XC)

001C-LEC –  TuTh 9:40-11:10AM

002C-LEC –  MoWe 1:50-3:20PM

A survey of ideas, issues and traditions related over time to the experiences of people of black American ancestry in the United States.

Anthropology 204 – Cultural Anthropology (GC) (NW) (SS) (XS)

002C-LEC –  TuTh 3:00-4:30PM

Focusing on the concept of ‘culture’, the course discusses the aims, methods, and achievements of anthropological research and presents a general model for comprehending human society.

Foreign Language 220 – Encounter, Marvel, and the Dark Side of Colonization in Latin American Texts (GC) (HU) (XC)

001C-LEC –  TuTh 9:40-11:10AM

This course examines the interpretation and re-articulation of what was conceived as a “New World” in texts of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries by Europeans and indigenous writers from Mesoamerica and the Andes. For our analysis, we examine the medieval notion of “Wonder” as used in texts such as John de Mandeville and Marco Polo. Our study of how explorers, Conquistadors, friars, and indigenous writers understood and wrote about the New World and its peoples provides a context to appreciate diverse cultures and their traditions and investigate forms of and sources of interaction, interdependence, and inequity in Latin American societies.

History 105 – Topics in the History of Early Civilization (NW) (SS) (XS)

001C-LEC – MoWeFr 12:40-1:40PM

002C-LEC – MoWeFr 1:50-2:50PM

Selected topics in the History of Early Civilizations. It may be offered with different content.

Philosophy 105 – Ethics (HU) (NW) (XC)

001C-LEC –  MoWeFr 9:10-10:10AM

002C-LEC –  MoWeFr 10:20-11:20AM

Analysis of the principal theories of ethics and their practical application to problems concerning the individual and society. Proposed methods of justifying moral principles will be examined. Ethics 105 is the Non-Western Culture version of Ethics 104. Students cannot receive credit for both Philosophy 104 and 105.

Political Science 101 – Introduction to Comparative Politics (GC) (NW) (SS) (XS)

001C-LEC –  MoWeFr 10:20-11:20AM

This course provides an introduction to key concepts and issues in comparative politics in the context of case studies from Europe, Asia, the Americas, Africa and the Middle East. It explores political participation and institutions, political ideology and culture, the role of government, political parties, democratization, economic development and inequality, nationalism, and ethnic and religious conflict in a variety of national and regional contexts around the globe.

Religious Studies 102 – World Religion (GC) (HU) (NW) (XC)

001C-LEC – TuTh 8:00-9:30AM

002C-LEC – TuTh 9:40-11:10AM

A historical survey of the basic experiential, mythical, doctrinal, ethical, ritual, and social dimensions in the world’s major traditions: tribal religion, Hinduism, Buddhism, Chinese and Japanese religions, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Students may not receive credit for both Religious Studies 102 and Religious Studies 110.

Sociology 153 – Intercultural Exploration of Families (ES) (SS) (XS)

001C-LEC –  Tu 5:00-8:00PM

This course examines the family system in the U.S. and across cultures, including the ways family structures both reinforce and challenge gender roles. Sociological and gender-based theories of the family are explored as well as the complex relationships among marriage, parenting, work, and family. Students will use ethical reasoning to navigate these relationships. Varieties of family experience are considered, with special attention given to issues concerning competing definitions of the family.

Theatre 152 – Non-Western Theatre (HU) (NW) (XC)

001C-LEC –  TuTh 11:30AM-1:00PM

A study of theatre outside the Euro-centric or Western tradition (to include African, Asian, and Indian, ritual, libation, dance, puppetry, masks, storytelling, etc.) which explores cultural differences and similarities in theatrical performance.

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Sustainability

How do people understand and create a more sustainable world?

Chemistry 104 – Introduction to Environmental Chemistry (NS) (XL)

A09C-LEC – MoWeFr 10:20-11:20AM

A01L-LAB – Mo 1:50-4:00PM OR A02L-LAB – Tu 8:00-10:10AM

This laboratory course will cover the chemistry of environmental topics such as: air pollution, ozone depletion, water pollution, acid rain, waste disposal and energy production. Occasionally tangentially related topics such as drug design and nutrition may be discussed.  This course may be combined with Chemistry 104, to form a two semester sequence for the Bachelor of Science degree. Note: Chemistry 104 is not a prerequisite for higher level chemistry courses.

English 226 – Modern American Literature (HU) (XC)

003C-LEC –  MoWe 1:50-3:20PM

A study of works by post-19th century American writers. Primarily for non-majors. Prerequisite: Any Writing-Based Inquiry Seminar (WBIS 188) or English 101 or English 110. Writing assignments will be required.

Philosophy 104C – Ethics (HU) (XC)

002C-LEC –  MoWeFr 12:40-1:40PM

Analysis of the principal theories of ethics and their practical application to problems concerning the individual and society. Proposed methods of justifying moral principles will be examined. Ethics 105 is the Non-Western Culture version of Ethics 104. Students cannot receive credit for both Philosophy 104 and 105.

Philosophy 109 – Introduction to Philosophy (HU) (XC)

003C-LEC –  TuTh 11:30AM-1:00PM

004C-LEC –  TuTh 1:20-2:50PM

A survey of some of the perennial problems of the human enterprise; the nature of reality, of truth, of knowledge, of beauty, of ideal political and social relationships, and of the good life; solutions to these problems offered by the best known Greek, medieval, and modern philosophers.

Political Science 115 – International Politics (GC) (SS) (XS)

002C-LEC –  MoWe 3:00-4:30PM

Development of the nation-state system; role of the great powers; the struggle for power; settlement of disputes; diplomacy, the quest for law, nationalism, contemporary problems.

 

COMM 111 (speaking) or WBIS 188 (writing) must be taken concurrently with Quest II courses, or their equivalent already completed.

Please make sure to choose Quest II courses when enrolling in TitanWeb. Some of the Quest II courses have the same titles as Explore courses (Quest II will be noted in Topic)

Blue text – sections end by 3 pm

Black text – sections end after 3 pm

Red text – interim course (5/14/18- 6/1/18)

COMM 111

Section                     Day/Time

001C               MoWeFr 10:20-11:20AM

002C               MoWeFr 11:30AM-12:30PM

003C               TuTh 9:40-11:10AM

004C               TuTh 11:30AM-1:00PM

005C               MoWeFr 1:50-2:50PM

006C               TuTh 1:20-2:50PM

007C               MoWeFr 8:00-9:00AM

008C               TuTh 11:30AM-1:00PM

009C               MoWeFr 1:50-2:50PM

010C               TuTh 11:30AM-1:00PM

011C               TuTh 1:20-2:50PM

012C               TuTh 3:00-4:30PM

013C              MoWeFr 11:30AM-12:30PM

014C              MoWeFr 1:50-2:50PM

015C              MoWeFr 3:00-4:00PM

016C              TuTh 8:00-9:30AM

017C              MoWeFr 10:20-11:20AM

018C              MoWeFr 8:00-9:00AM

019C              MoWeFr 11:30AM-12:30PM

020C              TuTh 8:00-9:30AM

021C              TuTh 11:30AM-1:00PM

022C              TuTh 8:00-9:30AM

023C              MoWeFr 11:30AM-12:30PM

024C              MoWeFr 9:10-10:10AM

025C              TuTh 9:40-11:10AM

026C              TuTh 11:30AM-1:00PM

027C              TuTh 1:20-2:50PM

028C              MoWeFr 9:10-10:10AM

029C              TuTh 11:30AM-1:00PM

301C              MTWTF 9:00AM-12:00PM

302C              MTWTF 9:00AM-12:00PM

WBIS 188

Section                       Day/Time

001C                MoWeFr 1:50-2:50PM

002C                MoWeFr 3:00-4:00PM

003C                MoWeFr 8:00-9:00AM

004C                MoWeFr 9:10-10:10AM

005C                MoWeFr 10:20-11:20AM

006C                MoWeFr 11:30AM-12:30PM

007C                TuTh 8:00-9:30AM

008C                TuTh 9:40-11:10AM

009C                TuTh 1:20-2:50PM

010C                TuTh 9:40-11:10AM

011C                TuTh 8:00-9:30AM

012C                TuTh 1:20-2:50PM

013C                MoWeFr 11:30AM-12:30PM

014C                MoWeFr 12:40-1:40PM

015C                MoWeFr 9:10-10:10AM

016C                MoWeFr 10:20-11:20AM

017C                MoWeFr 8:00-9:00AM

018C                MoWeFr 9:10-10:10AM

019C                MoWeFr 9:10-10:10AM

020C                MoWeFr 8:00-9:00AM

021C                MoWeFr 12:40-1:40PM

022C                MoWeFr 10:20-11:20AM

023C                MoWeFr 11:30AM-12:30PM

024C                TuTh 1:20-2:50PM

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Quest III

Blue text – sections end by 3 pm

Black text – sections end after 3 pm

Red text – interim course (5/14/18- 6/1/18)

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Civic Learning and Communication

How do people understand and engage in community life?

Computer Science 125 – World Wide Web Site Development  (XS)

301C-LEC – INTERIM – MTWTF 4:00-7:00PM, Community Partner: Local non-profit agencies

This is an introductory course on website design and online branding. It covers elementary aspects of popular web development software packages. You will learn to create complete websites using responsive design and web services. The expectations for prerequisite knowledge are only basic computer skills.

Community Experience: coming soon

History 210 – Topics in the Modern History of the United States (SS) (XS)

001C-LEC – TuTh 1:20-2:50PM, Community Partner: Polk Library & UW-Oshkosh Alumni

Selected topics in the Modern History of the United States: Oral History of the University.

Community Experience: In this course you become an Oral Historian. You will work with UW-Oshkosh Alumni to collect and record oral histories.  Traveling away from the university may be required.

Interdisciplinary 270 – Telling Stories for Fun, Profit, and World Peace (HU) (XC)

001C-LEC – TuTh 3:00-4:30PM, Community Partner: Local Oshkosh residents

True stories have great power. They have the power to inform/ they have power to effect change. Study how humans told personal stories through the ages, and how those stories shape our world. Hear stories firsthand, build awareness of your own civic identity and learn the components of good storytelling. Use your storytelling voice to help others tell their own stories with accuracy and compassion on multiple platforms (print and online).

Community Experience: In this course you become one of the story tellers behind Humans of Oshkosh. You will be required to venture into the local Oshkosh community, find interesting people, and tell their story.

Physical Education 208 – Effective Leadership in Adventure, Outdoor, and Recreation Education (SS) (XS)

001C-LEC – TuTh 11:20AM-12:50PM,  Tu 3:45PM-5:00PM or Th 3:45PM-5:00PM, Community Partner: Lighted Schoolhouse After School Program

This course presents the concepts of adventure, outdoor, and recreation education including cooperative and leadership activities Each student will take part in a civic engagement experience where they will help teach others how to react and respond to a variety of situations they engage in while being physically active. Some of the activities students could be involved in are: individual and dual sports, team sports and rock climbing, swimming, cycling, running, and ice skating. A focus will be placed on the pedagogical aspects of adventure, outdoor, and recreation education and how these activities build community through physical activity as well as the transferable skills of leadership in adventure, recreation, and in the outdoors.

Community Experience: In this course you will work with an area elementary school by creating an active recess experience for the students. You will plan activities to take to recesses to engage the students in physical activity. You will need to pass a criminal background check in order to work with children.

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Intercultural Knowledge

How do people understand and bridge cultural differences?

Anthropology 225 – Celebrating Culture through the Arts (ES) (HU) (XC)

A09C-LEC – TuTh 9:40-11:10AM, 001F Tu 3:45-4:45PM, 002F We 3:45-4:45PM, 003F Th 3:45-4:45PM

Community Partner: Lighted School House After School Program

This course will focus on community engagement with people of diverse ethnic groups utilizing anthropological approaches to visual art, music, and dance. In the course, students will examine how people of various cultural and ethnic backgrounds communicate through visual art, music, and dance about issues such as gender, family, identity, tradition, historical consciousness, ideology, experience, and more. At the same time, students will learn about anthropological approaches to art and performance, how art illuminates diverse cultures, and how knowledge of culture facilitates deeper understanding of the arts. In addition, the class will explore art and performance as experiential modes of learning that go beyond verbal and written means. As part of this process, students will learn about how anthropologists work with people, especially through ethnographic methods. These purposes converge in the students’ engagement in diverse peoples and arts in the local community.

Community Experience: : In this course you will work with children enrolled in the Lighted School House After School Program. There you will take the lessons learned in your course and apply them to lessons you will prepare for the elementary and middle school students. You will need to pass a criminal background check in order to work with children.

Interdisciplinary 224 – Conflict and Memorial (ES) (HU) (XC)

001C-LEC – MoWeFr 1:50PM-2:50PM Community Partner: Veteran’s Resource Center

Students will examine art/memorials and reference that knowledge in Community Engagement projects as they expand their knowledge and understanding of the ways monuments and memorials function for individuals, groups, and communities.

Community Experience: In this course you will work with culturally diverse military groups and individuals, learn their stories, and create mini monuments for those individuals.

Women & Gender Studies 204 – Global Perspectives on Women and Gender (GC) (NW) (SS) (XS)

001C-LEC – TuTh 9:40-11:10AM Community Partner: Women’s Center

Course examines women’s status and power around the globe, with a specific focus on the following issues; education, health and reproduction, family, gendered violence, work, the environment, and political representation. Focus on past and present transnational feminist movements to combat oppression and improve the lives of girls and women worldwide.

Community Experience: coming soon

Women & Gender Studies 226 – Saving Seeds, Saving Community (ES) (HU) (XC)

001C-LEC – TuTh 9:40-11:10AM Community Partner: Hmong Farmers

This course focuses on American ethnic women’s relationship to nature, the land and culture. Through collaborating with local women farmers and reading ethnic women’s writings, we will explore how people’s attitudes toward the land, animals and the earth are influenced by culture, beliefs and values shared by a group of people. Thus, we will begin to understand how people’s world view, their cultural perspective, shapes them. We will see how women’s choice to work the land is also a choice to create a future for themselves, their families and their communities.

Community Experience: In this course you will meet and interview a Hmong woman and her family about their experience coming to, and living in America.  You will work with a group to create a short presentation that will be shared at a campus event celebrating these individuals.

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Quest III Sustainability

How do people understand and create a more sustainable world?

Biology 104 – Ecosphere in Crisis (NS) (XL)

C09C-LEC – MoWeFr 9:10-10:10AM, C08L-LAB Mo 10:20AM-1:20PM Community Partner: Carl Traeger Elementary School

Treats humans as biological organisms that interact with the living and nonliving world.  Emphasis is given to how humans affect, and are affected by, their environment.  Topics covered include basic ecology, global change, renewable and nonrenewable energy sources, air and water quality, and biological diversity. Special course fees will be charged to cover the cost of transportation during local field trips.

Community Experience: In this course you will take lessons learned in the course and create programs that teach children about nature and biology. You will partner with Carl Traeger Elementary School where you will use their neighboring prairie as a living classroom.

English 294 – Literary Landscapes (HU) (XC)

371F-FLD –  INTERIM Study Abroad Community Partner: Burrenbeo Trust, Historic Graves

Literary Landscapes is a Quest III course designed to introduce you to the connections between literature, the environment, cultural inheritance, and civic action while completing a community experience related to the Signature Question: How do people understand and create a more sustainable world? As a QIII course, EN 294 requires 14 to 20 hours of experiential learning in addition to academic requirements.

Community Experience: In this course you will partner with organizations that are working to preserve the historic region, the Burren. Projects will vary based on the Burrenbeo Trust’s need at the time of travel. You will also work with Historic Graves where you will work as an Archeologist for the day. You will work on cataloging headstones in historic graveyards.

Political Science 214 – The Politics of Food (SS) (XS)

001C-LEC – MoWeFr 9:10-10:10AM Community Partner: ReThink & Oshkosh Area Community Pantry

In this course, we’ll learn about how food policy is made at the national, state, and local levels. Then we’ll examine how those policies impact the type and quantities of the food we eat, food distribution, food safety, and nutrition. Throughout, we’ll have an eye to the future: is our current food system sustainable: That is, will it last beyond our lifetimes? Our class will encounter these issues not only in the classroom, but through our work with partners in the Oshkosh community.

Community Experience: You will partner with the Oshkosh Area Community Pantry where you will see firsthand how politics affects what people can eat. You will participate in a variety of programs at the pantry and work on one larger project to assist the organization.

Writing 188 (WBIS)

Complete course descriptions available here

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